San Joaquin Valley Census Research Project

Survey results from the San Joaquin Valley Census Research Project show that the U.S. Department of Commerce’s decision to add a citizenship question to the 2020 Census would be likely to have a major impact in suppressing census response among San Joaquin Valley Latino immigrants and their social networks, who make up one-third of the region’s total population.

The first three of six reports on consequences of adding the citizenship question and other barriers to a complete count are available below. They are based on research conducted for The Center at Sierra Health Foundation and the San Joaquin Valley Health Fund.

San Joaquin Valley Latino Immigrants: Implications of Survey Findings for Census 2020 — Executive Summary

This executive summary provides highlights from the first of six reports on consequences of adding the citizenship question to Census 2020, with key findings from the project’s regionwide survey of and focus groups with first- and second-generation Latino immigrants.

Download the executive summary


San Joaquin Valley Latino Immigrants: Implications of Survey Findings for Census 2020

This first of six reports on consequences of adding the citizenship question to Census 2020 presents key findings from the project’s regionwide survey of and focus groups with first- and second-generation Latino immigrants.


Download the report


A Cascade Model: How Latino Immigrants’ Lowered Response Will Lead to Differential Undercount in 2020 — Executive Summary

This executive summary provides an overview of the Cascade Model report, which describes how lowered response rates are likely to affect each stage in the census process of data collection and processing.


Download the executive summary

A Cascade Model: How Latino Immigrants’ Lowered Response Will Lead to Differential Undercount in 2020

This report draws both on the research from the San Joaquin Valley Census Research Project and on previous analysis and research. It describes how lowered response rates are likely to affect each stage in the census process of data collection and processing.

Download the report


Troubled Reflections: Summary of Themes and Implications for Census 2020

This summary looks at the seven themes that emerged from the answers to questions about willingness to answer census questions, and implications for census promotion strategy and messaging.

Download the summary


Troubled Reflections: Latino Immigrants’ Thinking About Census 2020

This report focuses on answers to eight specific questions about willingness to answer census questions. The researchers explored how attitudes shape the decision-making of respondents and drive their evolving thinking about census participation.

Download the report



The San Joaquin Valley Census Research Project reports were researched by Census Research Advisor Edward Kissam and Research Project Advisor JoAnn Intili of the WKF Giving Fund, Survey Data and Operations Manager and Latino Focus Group Manager Cindy Quezada of Central Valley Immigrant Integration Collaborative, Data Manager and Analyst Dr. Richard Mines, and Director of California Institute for Rural Studies Gail Wadsworth, who served as Project Director and Analyst of Qualitative Data. Interviews were conducted by Rafael Flores, Jorge San Juan, Morena Fuentes, Marco Antonio Fuentes, Rigoberto Garcia and Lilia Becerril.Edward Kissam was the lead author of both reports.

The San Joaquin Valley Census Research Project is made possible with support from Sierra Health Foundation, Blue Shield of California Foundation, Hellman Foundation, The James Irvine Foundation, The Grove Foundation, Werner-Kohnstamm Family Giving Fund, New Venture Fund, Sunlight Giving and Heising-Simons Foundation.

Visit the Census 2020 Resources web page